Posts Tagged ‘Durham Arts Council’

AFTA Surveys Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts Organizations in the Triangle.

By Annie PoslusnyScreen Shot 2017-07-11 at 11.36.58 AM

Americans for the Arts has released the results of their Arts & Economic Prosperity Survey V. This survey analyzes the impact of nonprofit arts and culture organizations. These organizations support jobs, generate government revenue and are the cornerstone of the tourism industry. Here are their findings of the economic impact of nonprofit arts organizations throughout the Triangle region.

TOWN OF CARY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$9,181,952

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

399

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

346,534

For the complete Town of Cary report click here.

 

DURHAM COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$125,534,858

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

4,550

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

1,825,011

For complete Durham County results, learn more here.

 

ORANGE COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$85,406,375

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

3,352

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

1,464,834

To view the complete results for Orange County, click here.

WAKE COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$166,228,401

Total Economic Impact:

  • Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported: 6,601
  • Household income paid to residents: $124,823
  • Revenue generated to local government: $7,228,000
  • Revenue generated to state government: $8,640,000

Event-Related Spending by Arts and Culture Audiences – $78.4 million (excluding cost of admission):

  • Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events: 4,365,974
  • Average Event-Related Spending Per Person: $17.98 (excluding cost of admission):
  • Meals and Refreshments: $9.27
  • Souvenirs and Gifts: $2.44
  • Ground Transportation: $2.61
  • Overnight lodging (one night only): $1.43
  • Other/Miscellaneous: $2.23

See The Complete Wake County Report Here

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Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research.

 

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Arts Advocacy Brings More Money to Arts Statewide – What that means for the Triangle

 

By Ella Fang

Hand drawing money, isolated on white background

You may have heard the news that the NC General Assembly increased the North Carolina Arts Council budget in its last session.  Specifically, the new budget included these changes:

  • The Biennium (2 year) budget included a total increase of $800,000 non-recurring funding, including a $500,000 increase in Grassroots Arts Funds
  • Allocation of $715,422 for A+ Schools.
  • Total arts funding in the 2015 – 2017 Biennium budget went up $1,515,422 – a 14% increase in funding for grants and programs at the North Carolina Arts Council.

But what does this mean for the Triangle?

 

More Grassroots Funding for Triangle arts organizations

The Grassroots Arts Program (GAP) provides per capita-based funding for arts programming to all 100 counties across North Carolina ensuring opportunities for citizens to experience the arts in their own communities.  Grassroots money helps local arts organizations provide a diverse menu of arts opportunities, such as festivals, classes and performances, and also supports arts in schools, administrative overhead, and sub-grants to community agencies.  Grassroots funds are distributed to a designated arts organization in each county, which uses the funds for local programs and also regrants part of the money out to other organizations.   “Counties with more than 60,000 population are required to sub-grant/re-grant 50% of these funds. For some arts organizations, Grassroots funding is their only source for operating funds” said Leigh Ann Wilder, Arts in Communities Director at NC Arts Council.

Cary - Diwali

The Diwali Festival in Cary. Hum Sub is a receipient of a grant from United Arts of Raleigh and Wake County.

In the Triangle, United Arts Council of Raleigh and Wake County, Chatham County Arts Council, Johnston County Arts Council, Orange County Arts Commission and Durham Arts Council distrubute Grassroots funds, often adding it to funding raised locally. “For us, it means we are able to provide nine more grants for the local arts community.” said Ragen Carlile, Vice President for Education and Community Programs at United Arts Council. This increased funding can make a real difference to the local arts organizations and artists that receive funding from their county arts councils. Click here for a listing of investments by county.  Read more about Grass roots Arts Funding here.

What are A+ Schools?

The A+ Schools Program “is a whole-school reform model that views the arts as fundamental to how teachers teach and students learn in all subjects.”  The program is creating and supporting a statewide network of A+ Schools – 50 so far – that have adopted the A+ philosophy and practice, and that make a commitment to participating in network activities. Learn more about the A+ Schools program here and find a list of the A+ Schools in your county here.

SmART Inititative

Another NC Arts Council program with a direct effect on the Triangle is the The SmART Initiative, which provides grants and leadership for municipal arts-driven economic development programs.  So far, four North Carolina municipalities have projects funded under this program, including Durham. The Durham project created, first, an Arts Vision plan to connect the downtown arts districts.  See that Arts Vision plan here.  Momentum from the initial SmART Initiative work has resulted in a successful NEA grant to continue this project. Read more about the NEA funded grant here.

Arts Advocacy works!

This funding increase is great proof that arts advocacy works! ArtsNC, the statewide advocacy organization for the arts, provided the leadership behind this successful effort. They organized advocacy events statewide to teach people how and why they need to fight for the arts and organized and led ARTS Day 2016, an annual two-day conference of art and action that draws hundreds of North Carolinians to their state capital to learn, network, celebrate, and speak with one voice on behalf of the arts. They also worked with local organizations to

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Triangle ArtWorks Director, Beth Yerxa, led part of the Wake County delegation at Arts Day, seen here meeting with Rep. Yvonne Holley.

engage arts supporters to advocate for the Arts and give them the training and tools they need to be effective advocates.

Triangle ArtWorks worked with Arts NC to host such a regional training event, “Give a Damn About the Arts” on April 13, 2016.  To get a snapshot of that event, check out this video by Justin Gartman.  Arts advocates from across the Triangle also participated in Arts Day, meeting with their local representatives and telling them stories about how the arts impact their cities and their lives.

How do I apply for grants?

Triangle ArtWorks has links to all local and statewide granting opportunities on our website. Each county, and sometimes individual municipalities, have granting programs for nonprofit arts organizations, individual artists and arts projects.  The North Carolina Arts Council also supports arts organizations, emerging artists and individual artists. Find more information and links to all of these grant programs here.

Ella Fang is a new Raleigh resident, graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a Master of Public Administration in Nonprofit Management. A strong believer that art works, she coordinates the International Festival of Raleigh, volunteers with local arts organizations, and fights for arts accessibility. In her free time, she loves painting, reading, and camping with her husband and their dog Smokie.

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Grants from Durham and Cary support Triangle ArtWorks growth!

DurhamArtsCouncil_LOGO_WC_blk2x2 (4)We are happy to announce that Triangle ArtWorks has received financial grants from both Durham Arts Council and Town of Cary to continue our organizational capacity building work into 2017!

Triangle ArtWorks has been serving the Triangle since 2010, but is still entirely run by volunteers (yes, really) and is funded by donations.  We are a critical point in our development, where the success of the work and the platform we are building exceeds our “capacity”.

What does this mean?  Well, that, the Region is seeing an impact from the work that we are doing and there is demand for us to do more, but the fact that we are run completely by a volunteer staff on limited donations affects our ability to expand our work and programs or even to keep up with current demand for our work.  For Triangle ArtWorks to continue to establish our place in the regional community, we need support from the Community we serve.  We need to be able to build what non-profit folksTownOfCary_PrimarySolo call “organizational capacity”.  That is, we need more people and financial support to get the work done.  These people can include volunteers and Board members, but realistically, we need to build towards having experienced and paid staff.  And we don’t just need people, we need to have the right tools and resources to do our work better and more efficiently.

Last year, a grant from Duke Energy allowed us to bring on a local consultant, the amazing Maggie Clay Love, to provide the expert support and services we need to develop organizational capacity and create a plan for sustainable growth.  This work has been transformative for the Organization and already the office is running more smoothly, our Board is building and we are developing better tools and resources to continue to serve the Organization and the community more efficiently and effectively.  But there is lots more to do.

Hand drawing moneyThis year, we began to reach out to the Region we serve for financial support and are excited to announce that, so far, both Durham Arts Council and the Town of Cary have agreed to support our Capacity Building work for Fiscal Year 2017!  This support will allow us to continue to transform this Organization towards sustainability and  continue our work in the Triangle. But perhaps more importantly, this financial support shows that Durham Arts Council and the Town of Cary understand the role of the arts industry in the future of the Triangle region and believe in the work that Triangle ArtWorks is doing to support the arts community.

We thank the Durham Arts Council and the Town of Cary for making this big step to support our work and, though us, the work of all artists and arts organizations across the Triangle. Learn more about other Sponsors of Triangle ArtWorks here.  We look forward to working with other Triangle municipalities this year to develop additional support.

Believe in what we are building and want to support us?  Find out more here.

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Triangle Makerspaces added to ArtWorks Resources

by Dana Gentry

A makerspace provides an environment that fosters innovation, creativity, collaboration, and learning by doing and making. Makerspaces across Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill provide the opportunity for all residents of the Triangle to engage with and participate in out-of-the-box artistic involvement  by

Makerbot

Makerbot at Raleigh Makerspace

utilizing nuanced ways to produce their own kind of final product. Whether a participant looking for a space to be creative in has a long history of artistic engagement or is looking to tap into their creative side for perhaps the first time, the variety of opportunities to realize all types of talent in this area accommodates all that are seeking out a way to embrace and tap into their creativity.

Durham Arts Council Clay Studio. Photo by Teri Saylor

Durham Arts Council Clay Studio. (Photo by Teri Saylor)

Triangle ArtWorks has created a new Resource Page of makerspaces in the area to inform Triangle residents of what each different space has to offer to accommodate for different people’s interests, talents, and desires to become tangibly involved with the arts in their own ways. From clay studios to 3D printers to turning unconventional materials into something completely different, there are opportunities for everyone to involve themselves with the arts and to become their own kind of maker.

Find the new Makerspace Resource page here.

Dana Gentry is junior at UNC and is working at Triangle ArtWorks this semester as part of the UNC Apples (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences & Service) program. In addition to lots of other great work, Dana researched and created the Makerspace Resource Section. This summer, she continues her service to the Triangle Arts Community, working with Durham Arts Council as an intern. 

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New Resource Page on Arts in Schools Programs Around Triangle.

Plein air artist, Dan Nelson, talks to school children while he paints at Lacy Elementary in Raleigh.  This  day long visit was part of United Arts of Raleigh and Wake County's Arts in Schools program.

Plein air artist, Dan Nelson, talks to school children while he paints at Lacy Elementary in Raleigh. This day long visit was part of United Arts of Raleigh and Wake County’s Arts in Schools program.

There has been a lot of press lately about the value of arts education in schools and the declining rate of participation of school kids in arts education and programming.  Artists of all kinds often express a desire to get more involved in schools, but there is a lot of confusion about how exactly to do this.  To help ease this confusion, Triangle ArtWorks has added an Arts in Schools Resource Page on its site.

First, we have to thank ArtWorks volunteer, Chellie LaPointe, for all the hard work behind creating this Resource Page. Chellie researched all of these programs and interviewed people involved in each program to assure that the information was not only accurate, but also that we were able to point out important aspects of each program.

Baba Chuck Davis, of African American Dance Ensemble, captivates a gym full of school children.

Baba Chuck Davis, of African American Dance Ensemble, captivates a gym full of school children.

Our goal in creating this page is to make it easier for artists of all disciplines to learn about all the arts in schools programs that exist in the Triangle and get a quick understanding of how each of the programs operates.  Our discussion of each program is not exhaustive, but we highlight certain requirements or aspects of each program that may affect the type of artist programs they are looking for or the application process itself.

As always, let us know if this resource is helpful, or if you see any changes needed.  Also, let us know what additional resources we can add to the site!

Beth

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