Posts Tagged ‘creative economy’

Arts Funding in the Federal Budget – Where Does it Stand?

The federal budget process is long and complicated, perhaps especially so in these politically dynamic times. As of this writing, there appear to be two competing visions of federal funding for the arts. In the recently adopted short-term budget for FY2017, Congress increased funding for the arts in several areas: The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities each received $2 million increases in their budgets, bringing their total respective budget figures to almost $150 million. Several other arts programs also received increases in the temporary FY2017 budget enacted by Congress.

Despite these increases, the longer-term status of arts funding remains unclear. The White House version of the FY2018 federal budget would vastly reduce federal funding for the arts overall, and would aim to ultimately eliminate the NEA, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). Funding for these agencies in the White House budget would be minimal, directed at winding down operations.

Congress is now engaged in the lengthy process of reviewing and modifying the White House-proposed FY2018 budget; no doubt there will be many twists and turns in the process. The increases in arts funding in the short-term FY2017 budget suggest that advocacy efforts directed at the Congressional level may be the most effective method of assuring continued funding for the arts. Americans for the Arts is one of a number of national arts advocacy organizations that are closely involved in lobbying efforts on behalf of arts funding. The organization’s Mobilization Center is an excellent source of timely information on those efforts.

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Groundworkk – How $5 Can Empower the Arts Community

By Amy Saltmarsh

There is a new method in the  Triangle to raise money for your creative idea. groundworkk is a monthly social event that connects local entrepreneurs, artists, and (for the evening) venture capitalists. On the second and fourth Tuesday of each month, a crowd pays a $5 door fee and gathers at a pre-selected venue (Raleigh’s Longview Center, the HUB Raleigh, Tir Na Nog, and Durham’s Mercury Studios, to name a few). From 6:30 to 8:30pm the crowd enjoy presentations, networking, and a light cocktail hour. Presentations start at 7:00 and presenters are given four minutes to pitch their creative ideas and projects to the audience. Each presentation is followed by six minutes of audience led Q&A. After the pitches, attendees enjoy food prepared by a local chef and then, it’s time to vote! At 8:30pm votes are tallied and the winner is announced. The winner is awarded the evening’s earnings via the ever symbolic mason jar. 

groundworkk founder Matt Konar, with first grounworkk "winner" Whitney Robinson.

groundworkk operates through Raleigh and Durham Executive Committees. Each committee is charged with selecting and mentoring presenters and assisting with event logistics. groundworkk Raleigh’s Executive Committee is comprised of Victor Lytvinenko of Raleigh Denim, Carolyn Jackson of Raleigh Charter High School, Matt Tomasulo of City Fabric, and Daniel Whittaker of Green Planet Catering. Durham’s Executive Committee is comprised of Katie DeConto of Mercury Studio,  Laura Ritchie of The Carrack Modern Art, and Krista Anne Nordgren of The Makery.

How to become a presenter.

Triangle entrepreneurs and artists submit their ideas to groundworkk via groundworkk.com. With the input of the Executive Committees, up to four presenters are selected each month. Leading up the the groundworkk event, presenters are assigned a mentor who assists them with the planning, conceptualization, and logistics required for their presentations. 

To date, groundworkk winners include: Whitney Robinson of Freshly Given, a leather accessory line; Chris Tonelli and Charles Wilkes of So and So Books, an up and coming downtown Raleigh bookstore; Aaron Gerry of Startup and Play; Owen Jordan of Resqd; and Chef Kabui of Organics and Sound, an all organic catering company in Durham. 

Upcoming events include:

DURHAM: Tuesday, 22 January 2013 at Mercury Studio
RALEIGH: Tuesday, 12 February 2013 at the Visual Art Exchange

For regular updates visit www.groundworkk.com/subscribe.html.  

Amy is the Manager of the Midtown Farmers’ Market in North Hills and the Sales Manager for Green Planet Catering.  She’s also the behind the scenes charge for groundworkk and has a love of all things locally grown and created. 

 

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Help ArtWorks Connect This Community – Be a Partner!

Triangle ArtWorks mission is to connect, support, promote and advocate for the visual and performing arts and creative industry in the Triangle. We are creating a center point and a platform for this community to be supported AS AN INDUSTRY.  This platform and network makes it easier for this community to act as a business community, and also makes it easier for other segments of the business community to connect with the Triangle arts and creative industry as an industry group.  ArtWorks will be able to use the platform and network to keep the community, as a whole, informed about issues that affect their businesses and to “sit at the table” for this community in economic development and other regional efforts, such as we are already doing with NC Tomorrow.

ArtWorks brings the disciplines together at its recent Durham Mixer.

To build this platform, we need help. We need to create a Network of Partner businesses and organizations that believe in the power of the arts and creative industry and believe in what Triangle Artworks is doing and want to be a part of this work.

Who can be an ArtWorks Partner?

If you are a member of the visual and performing arts and creative industry in the Triangle, both for profit or non-profit, then you can be an ArtWorks Partner. If you are not a member of this industry, but understand the important role that this industry plays in our Region’s economy and quality of life and, therefore, want to support this industry, we also welcome you as a Partner. ArtWorks Partners will connect through ArtWorks to create a powerful and valuable network for this industry.

Triangle Emerging Arts Leaders Group, organized by ArtWorks, brings together arts leaders for networking, learning and fun.

 

What will Partners Do?

Triangle ArtWorks simply cannot build this community network alone. ArtWorks will stand in the center as a clearing house, a convener and a center point. But there need to “spokes on the wheel” leading out from ArtWorks into the community.   When you become an ArtWorks Partner, you are saying “Yes! We understand what ArtWorks is doing and we are IN!”

Specifically, ArtWorks Partners agree to support the ArtWorks’ mission in the following ways:

  • Advise ArtWorks of any job openings, networking or educational opportunities, or other news of interest to the community, so that it can keep the regional community informed and help community members be more successful.
  • Help ArtWorks spread the word regarding issues affecting the regional arts community, including advocacy issues, as they apply to your discipline or specific community.
  • Promoting Triangle ArtWorks and its Partner Network by including a link on their website, displaying your Partner decal in your storefront or other visible place, and through any communication tools you have, with content created by you or provided by ArtWorks.
  • Help promote and/or attend ArtWorks programs and events.

    NC Tomorrow

    Triangle ArtWorks is representing the Triangle arts and creative industry on the Advisory Committee for NC Tomorrow.

Our Partner Network will become the backbone for our work in bringing this Community together and supporting it.  Specifically, we will be working to:

 

  • Connect the arts industry to each other and the rest of the business community
  • Inform members of the arts industry about local, national issues and opportunities
  • Create programs to strengthen the arts/creative community
  • Support knowledge sharing and collaboration
  • Promote the Triangle arts industry.

By making the arts and creative industry in the Triangle even more successful, we make the Triangle an even better place to live, work and locate a business. Join us in this important work!

To become a Partner, read and sign the Partner Agreement here.

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NC State Begins Offering Arts Entrepreneurship Minor

by Sarah Endaya

While the idea that the arts are an important business community is not a new idea, supporting them like one is.  NC State has recently taken a significant step in that direction by recognizing and training emerging arts entrepreneurs.  In the Spring semester of 2012, NC State began offering a minor in Arts Entrepreneurship. The program at NC State is one of only three such programs offered in the country and the only one that is offered campus wide.

Dr. Gary Beckman developed the Arts Entrepreneurship Minor program for NC State.

The Minor is a Music Department initiative directed and developed by  Dr. Gary Beckman. Beckman comes to NC State from the University of South Carolina School of Music where he developed the country’s first music entrepreneurship minor, edited the field’s first essay collection, Disciplining the Arts: Teaching Entrepreneurship in Context, and co-founded the world’s first academic journal on arts entrepreneurship education, Artivate, where he serves as founding co-editor.

Classes include Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship, Practical Art Entrepreneurship, Capstone Experience in Art Entrepreneurship and more. These classes help students envision the arts in different ways, learn how and where art is consumed and how to become arts entrepreneurs. Dr. Beckman uses a mentorship approach to teaching and gives the students an opportunity to work with the Raleigh arts community through the Capstone Experience.  This course puts students in a “consulting role” for Raleigh art entrepreneurs and arts organizations, in addition to building their professional network.

Dr. Beckman also works to build a community in the classroom. The students who are currently taking this minor come from all over campus. No previous arts experience is required. At its core, the Minor is designed to be a platform for students to express their major discipline in the arts, from engineering to management to zoology. Students simply explore what it is they want to do as an arts entrepreneur and make it their own. The students get real experience and exposure to the arts community through classes, hands on experience, and projects that explore all spectrums of the arts, such as music technology, textiles, film,  music production and more.

Arts Entrepreneurship in action at the Lulu eGames

Student entrepreneurs from Lulu eGames Arts Feasibility Study winner, Leiva Strings, talk to Gordon Smith during the eGames Expo.

Even though this program is new, a number of Dr. Beckman’s students are already following through with their entrepreneurial ideas and starting businesses this summer. This year, an Arts Entrepreneurship Feasibility Study Category was added to NCSU’s Lulu eGames (hosted by the NCSU Entrepreneurship Initiative in partnership with Lulu).Four students from the Arts Entrepreneurship program competed in the final round, where students completed a feasibility study for a new for-profit or non-profit arts venture, and each finished with prize awards.

Demand for this minor is quickly growing. Dr.Beckman is working to make this minor an integral part of the university and will continue to elevate the program and its presence in the arts community. His vision is to make the Minor a national model in Arts Entrepreneurship education and a premier training ground for emerging arts entrepreneurs both in the Triangle and nationally. NC State’s Arts Entrepreneurship Minor is a foundational brick helping to empower the Triangle  arts community.

Sarah Endaya is a volunteer for Triangle Artworks and a Business Administration student at North Carolina State University.  She enjoys making music and finding out more about the Triangle’s arts community in her free time.

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Help shape the future of the arts in Garner on April 23.

Do you live in Garner?  Do you have ideas for how the Town can be more supportive of its arts community and more welcoming to artists of all disciplines?

The  Garner Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department and Garner Revitalization Association are working together to create a Town that is more supportive to artists and provides more of what they need to succeed; and to promote collaboration between the arts community and the rest of Garner’s business community.

And the best way to start to develop such a plan is to get input from the arts community itself.  So, they inviting local artists and creative professionals  of all disciplines to attend a networking meeting on Monday, April 23 at the Garner Performing Arts Center located at 742 W. Garner Road.  The event will begin at 6 p.m. with dinner and networking, followed by a brainstorming and discussion session from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

As stated in the event invitation, these organizations “are working to grow the impact of the arts on the local economy. To do this effectively, we need your help to understand:

  • Who our local artists are and what they create
  • What resources artists need to create, exhibit, perform or sell more of their works
  • Ideas for events, promotions, markets and other ways to increase awareness of the arts
  • Ideas for collaborations between artists and the business community to spark economic development

All artists are encouraged to attend, including visual artists, performing artists, photographers, creative professionals, hobbyists and anyone interested in helping grow the arts in the Garner community.”

Triangle ArtWorks will be working with these organizations to facilitate the event.  Please join us!  Also, please spread the word to other members of the Garner arts community.

Beth

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These population demographics may surprise you….

What will our region's population look like in 10 years?

UPDATE!!  Mitch Silver will be presenting his “Understanding Trends – Planning for the Future” talk on August 14 at Fuquay-Varina Community Center (Click for More info).  

Mitch Silver, City of Raleigh’s Planning Director (and husband of ArtWorks awesome Board member, Mary Silver!) is currently traveling the country, talking about  what the results of the 2010 Census tell us. As President of the American Planning Association, Silver is mostly talking to city planners and economic development people around the Country. But the information is important for people in all business areas to know.

And the information in these talks will surprise you about what it tells us about changing families, changes in lifestyle trends and the aging of America.

Things such as:

  • By 2030, North Carolina will be the 7th largest State (and Silver suggests that we start to act like it).
  • Single households are increasing, while “traditional families” are decreasing.
  • The Hispanic population is expected to triple from 2008 to 2050 (Due to the birth of children, not immigration.)

If you run a business or arts organization, or if you are planning on starting a business, these are numbers you need to know.

How will future populations want to spend their free time?

Mitch has presented this talk to many groups locally, and I was lucky to see it for the first time at United Arts of Wake County’s “State of the Arts and Culture” event in Wake County” event at NCMA.   You can find online a summary of his talk that was part of the Chapel Hill 2020 process, you can watch the complete presentation that was part of Innovate Raleigh on Raleigh Television Network between now and February 26, or much of the information is immediately viewable here (the relevant statistics start around 35:00).  Although the summary is good, the presentations are better, as you get to hear Mitch’s comments on the trends and what he thinks they may mean.

The business or arts organization that is not aware of these trends and prepared to adapt their work accordingly, will likely suffer in the future.  Don’t be caught unaware. Get informed.

Beth

 

 

 

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New Legal Resources added to Site.

Do you have a business idea and don’t know where to start?  Do you have a creative idea that you want to protect?  Do you even know where to start to look into these issues?

L-R, UNC Law Students Eric Roehling, Amanda Gladin-Kramer, David Kirby.

Well, Triangle ArtWorks is here to help. A great team of law students from UNC Law School’s Pro Bono Program has scoured the internet for you and pulled together a list of the best resources and links they could find on the issues of business form and copyright. Although these resource pages are not a substitute for legal advice and CERTAINLY should not be used as such, they are a good place to start.  We have done that first search for you, saving you the time of searching the internet and wasting time on irrelevant sites.

So far, we have loaded new sections of the Resource Directory on Copyright/Trademark and Starting a For-Profit Business. We will be adding resources on Contracts and other business forms after the first of the year.

But wait, there’s more…..

Pulling together these resources is just the first step.  Now that we have the basics on the site, ArtWorks will start looking at other ways to help fill the legal needs of the community. Some possibilities we are looking at are articles on relevant legal topics,  short talks or “ask a lawyer” session on general or specialized topics, or development of a Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts-type program.

If you want to help or have input for us on programs or needs, let us know!

Beth

 

 

 

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Urgent Call to Action-Arts grants cut 23%

I spent the last two days at Arts Day 2011, that great annual advocacy event organized by Arts NC, where arts advocates from across the state meet in Raleigh for two days of networking, education, but most importantly, visiting our locals legislators and talking to them about the importance of the arts and culture industry to the state and asking for their continued support.

Sen. Stein and Rep. Weiss address the Wake County delegation at Arts Day.

Although it was fun as always to see so many amazing arts people in one room (400 people!), the mood this year was certainly different.   Given the economic issues faced by the State, our message from Arts NC was to support Governor Perdue’s budget, which proposed a 10% cut to the Department of Cultural Resources.  In our meetings with legislators, however, we heard from many that the cuts would likely be worse, although noone had specific information.

Well, by the end of the day, our worst fears were realized. The draft budget, released yesterday afternoon, proposed a 23% cut in the grants program for the North Carolina Arts Council ($1,500,000) and a 15% overall Department of Cultural Resources reduction. This can be changed, but only if people who know what the arts and culture industry do for our State and what the Department of Cultural Resources, and its grant program, do for this industry, take action.  We all need to contact our state legislators, but more importantly at this point, the members of the Appropriations Committee and House General Government Committee.

Arts NC has sent out the following Call to Action:

IMMEDIATE ACTION IS REQUIRED. This unfair recommendation can be changed by the Appropriations Chairs and Republican members of the House General Government Committee.

Be strong, loud, and respectfully angry. Keep it short but clear. Use only one of the following points in your own words. Complete this Call To Action no later than Thursday, 12 noon. Forward this Call to others and strongly encourage action.

THE CONSTANT MESSAGE SHOULD BE:   RESTORE THE CUTS TO THE NORTH CAROLINA ARTS COUNCIL’S GRANTS PROGRAMS TO THE GOVERNOR’S RECOMMENDED 10%.

Why would the leadership in North Carolina disproportionately target an industry that:

  • Produces programs and revenue in all 100 counties?
  • Produces $223 million in revenue and serves 9 million attendees yearly?
  • Matches every dollar of state money with an additional seventeen dollars?
  • Will be forced to raise ticket prices and therefore negatively affect the local economy in related spending in restaurants and retail?
  • Is good for business in our state?

THE ARTS ARE REVENUE PRODUCERS, NOT REVENUE CONSUMERS!

Call To Action:

Call the Raleigh offices of the House Appropriations Chairs:

Representative Harold Brubaker -919-715-4946, Harold.Brubaker@ncleg.net

Representative Jeff Barnhart: 919-715-2009, Jeff.Barnhart@ncleg.net

Representative Mitch Gillespie: 919-733-5862, Mitch.Gillespie@ncleg.net

Representative Linda Johnson:  919-733-5861,  Linda.Johnson2@ncleg.net

Call the Raleigh offices of the House General Government Chairs: (Republicans)

Representative George Cleveland – 919-715-6707, George.Cleveland@ncleg.net

Representative Dale Folwell – 919-733-5787, Dale.Folwell@ncleg.net

Representative Glen Bradley – 919-733-5860, Glen.Bradley@ncleg.net

Representative Mike Hager – 919-733-5749, Mike.Hager@ncleg.net

Representative Kelly Hastings – 919-715-2002, Kelly.Hastings@ncleg.net

Representative Grey Mills – 919-733-5741, Grey.Mills@ncleg.net

Representative Ruth Samuelson – 919-715-3009, Ruth.Samuelson@ncleg.net

Representative John Torbett – 919-733-5868, John.Torbett@ncleg.net

Send an email only if you are unable to reach the Raleigh office.
For additional advocacy information, see Arts North Carolina’s new website at www.artsnc.org.  Please forward responses to your communications to Arts NC’s email.

I will add my personal request to EVERYONE to do this.  Although you may not think you will be personally affected by cuts to grants from the NC Arts Council (see their grantees here) the impact of these groups is far reaching.  Not only do their events fill restaurants and enliven downtowns, they teach our kids, help create community, create jobs and make our towns great places to live.  The economic impact of these groups goes beyond tax impact and retail impact, and these state leaders are forgetting that.   The impact will be felt strongly in the vibrancy of our communities, and that, in turn, will make our region, and this state, a less desirable place to live.  The majority party, which is behind these cuts, say they are only thinking of jobs in making these cuts, but these cuts will cost the state money, jobs, and affect future growth.  Some may say this argument is a stretch, but I say those that think so are not paying attention, or maybe they should just ask their kids what makes their towns a great place to live.

I will also echo Arts NC’s request to make these calls/emails personal.  If you have a personal story on the impact of the arts on your community, your life, your family, or your work, tell it to them.  If you know anyone in the legislature, use that connection.

The Creative Community in the Triangle and the broader community that supports it, need to be heard on this issue.  We are an economic force.

Beth

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So, how DO we build community?

As a service to the Triangle Creative Community, ArtWorks follows hundreds of creative information sources to find information relevant to this community and aggregates them on Twitter, Facebook and the Website.  We must be doing something right, as our followers are growing in numbers daily.

But every once in a while, I find an article in my research that makes me want to scream “Yes!  Exactly! That’s just what we are trying to do!”.  Recently, I found an article in the Trenton Times, of all places, that got me thinking.  In the article, the writer, Meir Rinde, talks about the abundance of arts groups in the Trenton area, saying:

So many groups, educational programs and individual artists call the city home, but in fact,…..they don’t know about each other, despite their proximity, arts boosters say.  As a result, these groups don’t collaborate as much as they could, and they have not fulfilled their potential as an economic engine for the city. …What Trenton needs to do …… is build the connection between these initiatives and other things that are going on in the city,” said Leonardo Vazquez, an urban planner at Rutgers University.

It was a similar frustration amongst members of  the creative community in the Triangle that led to the launch of Triangle ArtWorks.  What can we do to change this?

ArtWorks was begun, in part, on a belief that if the creative community itself was able to connect to EACH OTHER better, for networking, collaboration, services, support, brainstorming, WHATEVER…then they would be able to do what they do better and, hopefully, as a result, be more successful.  In his article, Rinde speaks of recent networking events in Trenton bringing together  “art worlds” that ” had not previously collided”.  I love this idea of “collisions” causing increased creativity.

Rinde suggests that in Trenton “One unanswered question is where the long-term leadership and organization to coordinate and market the art scene should come from” Not in the Triangle….we have ArtWorks!

Over the next several months, ArtWorks will begin several new efforts, including working toward some networking events to give you opportunities to “collide” with other creative people in the Triangle.  Wouldn’t it be great if you could meet others in the Triangle that do what you do, so you could hear about they addressed certain issues, how they got started, or who they use for certain services?  Or maybe meet the people that provide services you didn’t know existed?  Or perhaps meet JUST the person/group that can fill a need in a project you are working on?

But we struggle with what format to start such efforts.  Should we start a series of “ArtWorks after Hours” like Springboard for the Arts in St. Paul?  Should we have a more formal “creative summit” like in Trenton? Or perhaps something in-between, like short talks, followed by mingling?

Should we try to hold them centrally, or move them around the Triangle?  Any ideas for venues?

We need your ideas and input!  Lets start colliding!

Beth
info@triangleartworks.org

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