Posts Tagged ‘Americans for the Arts’

AFTA Surveys Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts Organizations in the Triangle.

By Annie PoslusnyScreen Shot 2017-07-11 at 11.36.58 AM

Americans for the Arts has released the results of their Arts & Economic Prosperity Survey V. This survey analyzes the impact of nonprofit arts and culture organizations. These organizations support jobs, generate government revenue and are the cornerstone of the tourism industry. Here are their findings of the economic impact of nonprofit arts organizations throughout the Triangle region.

TOWN OF CARY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$9,181,952

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

399

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

346,534

For the complete Town of Cary report click here.

 

DURHAM COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$125,534,858

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

4,550

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

1,825,011

For complete Durham County results, learn more here.

 

ORANGE COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$85,406,375

Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported:

3,352

Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events:

1,464,834

To view the complete results for Orange County, click here.

WAKE COUNTY

Total Industry Expenditures:

$166,228,401

Total Economic Impact:

  • Full-time equivalent jobs (FTE) supported: 6,601
  • Household income paid to residents: $124,823
  • Revenue generated to local government: $7,228,000
  • Revenue generated to state government: $8,640,000

Event-Related Spending by Arts and Culture Audiences – $78.4 million (excluding cost of admission):

  • Total Attendance to Arts and Culture Events: 4,365,974
  • Average Event-Related Spending Per Person: $17.98 (excluding cost of admission):
  • Meals and Refreshments: $9.27
  • Souvenirs and Gifts: $2.44
  • Ground Transportation: $2.61
  • Overnight lodging (one night only): $1.43
  • Other/Miscellaneous: $2.23

See The Complete Wake County Report Here

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Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research.

 

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Arts Funding in the Federal Budget – Where Does it Stand?

The federal budget process is long and complicated, perhaps especially so in these politically dynamic times. As of this writing, there appear to be two competing visions of federal funding for the arts. In the recently adopted short-term budget for FY2017, Congress increased funding for the arts in several areas: The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities each received $2 million increases in their budgets, bringing their total respective budget figures to almost $150 million. Several other arts programs also received increases in the temporary FY2017 budget enacted by Congress.

Despite these increases, the longer-term status of arts funding remains unclear. The White House version of the FY2018 federal budget would vastly reduce federal funding for the arts overall, and would aim to ultimately eliminate the NEA, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). Funding for these agencies in the White House budget would be minimal, directed at winding down operations.

Congress is now engaged in the lengthy process of reviewing and modifying the White House-proposed FY2018 budget; no doubt there will be many twists and turns in the process. The increases in arts funding in the short-term FY2017 budget suggest that advocacy efforts directed at the Congressional level may be the most effective method of assuring continued funding for the arts. Americans for the Arts is one of a number of national arts advocacy organizations that are closely involved in lobbying efforts on behalf of arts funding. The organization’s Mobilization Center is an excellent source of timely information on those efforts.

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Triangle ArtWorks Director Elected to AFTA Private Sector Council

We are thrilled to announce that our Executive Director, Beth Yerxa, has been elected to the Americans for the Arts (AFTA) Private Sector Council. AFTA is the leading organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America and Private Sector Council members advise Americans for the Arts’ staff on developing programs and services that will build a deeper connection to the field and the network membership. As part of the Private Sector Council, Yerxa will also work with fellow arts leaders to develop and implement private-sector advocacy programs and serve as leaders to other local arts agencies seeking to connect with the private sector.

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Private Sector Council members of a tour of the Wynwood Arts District in Miami.

“Americans for the Arts strives to cultivate the next generation of arts leaders in America, and I am pleased to welcome Beth Yerxa to our advisory council,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “These leaders are willing to dedicate their time and expertise to work with peers across the country to shape national programs and messages and help craft services for states, communities, and local organizations”.

Private Sector mtg Miami notes

Brainstorming notes from the Council meeting (w/ a view of Miami!)

This position also provides Triangle ArtWorks a unique opportunity to deepen relationships we already have with other arts leaders around the Country and not only keep up with, but be a part of affecting changing trends in the arts around the country.  This knowledge and access will help Yerxa and Triangle ArtWorks advise Triangle arts leaders, as well as serve the Triangle arts community better. Directors of arts organizations from Miami/Dade, Nashville, Philadelphia, San Francisco and many other cities and towns are represented on the Council.

In January, Yerxa participated in her first Private Sector meeting, where she was briefed on changing trends in arts, such as the CREATE Act.  She also provided input into the discussion about the changing field of arts support and the role of the arts and culture segment in the larger “creative economy” and tp talk about the work that Triangle ArtWorks is doing to support this business segment here in the Triangle.

 

 

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TEAL – Triangle Emerging Arts Leaders Roundtable June 23rd

Are you getting the support you need to grow as an arts leader?

A recent TEAL monthly lunch at Bocci.

What resources or programs do you need?

Come learn how others are finding support and help us look at ways to better support Emerging Leaders.

This article in the recent Americans for the Arts Emerging Leaders blog salon, caused several TEAL members to contact us and say “Are emerging leaders getting the support they need?” So…let’s talk about it!

Join us for a TEAL roundtable discussion about what pressures Emerging Leaders feel to grow, learn, and adapt their work, and how they are dealing with it.  Talk to other Triangle’s young arts leaders about how and where they are getting the support and resources they need.  Also, help ArtWorks identify unmet needs and help us brainstorm on ways to meet them.

Afterwards,  join other Emerging Leaders and more “seasoned” arts leaders for networking, fun and perhaps a local beer or two!

Date: Monday, June 23rd
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Mercury Studio 401 W. Geer Street Durham (behind & below Motorco)

The Game Plan:

6:30-7 Networking and Mingling
7:00 Roundtable discussion begins
8:30 Group adjourns to Fullsteam to continue discussion/networking
We will also be inviting leadership from other arts service organizations to listen to the discussion, so that we can have more minds and organizations involved in working on this issue.

Let us know you are coming! RSVP by email.

 

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The Federal Artist Deduction Bill- What it means to artists and what you can do.

by Joan Blazich

It seems like a variation of this bill comes around every few years in Congress, yet it never makes it past the committee level. But it should, because it will have a massive impact on ALL artists. Why?  Because, as of right now, there exists a disparate gap between how artists and collectors are treated when it comes to claiming IRS tax deductions for donating works of art. This definition of art includes literary, musical, artistic, and scholarly creations.

Under current laws, a collector who chooses to donate an artistic work to a nonprofit institution such as a school, museum, etc., may deduct the fair market value of that piece for tax purposes. So, if the going rate for the artists work is, say, $5000, that collector can deduct $5000. However, if an artist chooses to donate one of their works to a nonprofit entity, as the law stands now, they are only entitled to deduct the costs of creating that work.

So, a visual artist can deduct the costs of construction materials such as canvas, paint, clay, etc., but nothing more. For musical compositions, you could donate the cost of staff paper; for literary compositions, the cost of typing paper, etc… you get the general idea. Given the ever-increasing costs of artistic supplies, as well as the time and effort that goes into creating every artistic creation, it doesn’t make much sense for artists to not receive full deduction credits for their donations. After all, that creation has value, something which remains regardless of whether the item in question is sold or donated.

Thankfully, a bipartisan group of Representatives in the U.S. House is again working on a bill that would help correct this imbalance. Known as the Artist Deduction Bill, H.R. 1190, this legislation would end this disparity by granting artists the same deduction allowances as collectors.  This would not only offer an immediate benefit to artists, but may also help to increase donations to nonprofit entities in the future.

This sounds like a great idea! How can I show my support?

The great people at American’s for the Arts have made it very easy to help support this legislation- all it takes are a few clicks of a mouse. Click here to petition your Representative online to support this bill. I just did it, and it literally took less than one minute to make my support of this bill known to my local Representative, David Price. Americans for the Arts provides a form letter.  However, as always when sending such letters, if you have time, providing personal stories or examples of the impact of the issue on your life and work would make the letter more effective.

Taxes are never enjoyable for anyone, and we all want every deduction we can claim. This includes artists, whose creative endeavors make our communities a better, brighter, more intellectually-stimulating place. So why not give our artists the same tax deduction opportunity as collectors? Please take a few moments to contact your local Representative in support of H.R. 1190. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it will make a significant difference for all of our artists.

Joan Blazich, who is interning for Triangle ArtWorks this summer, is a second-year law student at the University of North Carolina School of Law. She also holds a Doctorate in Music and is an active performer in numerous local ensembles. She can be reached by email

Do you have something to say to the Triangle arts and creative community?  Be a writer or guest blogger for ArtWorks!  Do you have news to share? Help us keep this community informed! Email

 

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