Archive for the ‘venues’ Category

CURRENT Opening Electrifies Downtown Chapel Hill Arts

Downtown Chapel Hill gained an exciting new arts venue with the February 2 opening of the  CURRENT™ ArtSpace + Studio on Franklin Street.CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio Presented by California Performing Arts at the University of North Carolina, the 7,000-square-foot space houses both an adaptable black box-style theater and multi-purpose studio. The facility is designed to feature immersive and co-creative arts experiences, including interactive theater and full-scale installations by exciting and emerging artists. CURRENT™ will also serve as Carolina Performing Arts’ physical and intellectual home for world-class artists-in-residence to collaborate with faculty, researchers, students, and the community.

The new venue,  strategically located in the new, mixed-use development adjacent to both the UNC campus and the vibrant downtown shopping and dining district, is distinguished by its unconventional, flexible architecture. The 3,000-square-foot Studio features three floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the Carolina Square outdoor space, passersby can peek in to see dance rehearsals, artist lectures, and much more.

Photo & Caption, University Gazette: The CURRENT venue features one wall that is all glass and seating that can go anywhere (one side to four sides)—or nowhere (completely retractable).

The Studio is also a new home for the Carolina Performing Arts artists-in-residence to develop their work in collaboration with others. The theater space can accommodate many different configurations, depending upon the needs of a particular event, from artist talks to post-performance gatherings, creative workshops, and many other artistic and community events.

IMG_9415

Emil Kang, Executive and Artistic Director of UNC Performing Arts and Special Assistant to the Chancellor at UNC, speaks at the Opening Ceremonies.

The CURRENT™ opening ceremonies included a tour of the inaugural Sound Maze installation by artist Paul Dresher. Sound Maze is a hands-on art experience featuring more than a dozen giant musical instruments invented by Dresher. Visitors were invited to wander through and discover new ways of creating sound with these fantastical instruments. Opening events included works involving audience participation (“We are Gob Squad and So are You,” and “Revolution Now” by Gob Squad) ; activist hip-hop performance (Boots Riley and the Coup); and contemporary theatre (“The Fever” by 600 Highwaymen).

Tags: , , ,

The PIT – Performance Venue & Classroom Space on Franklin Street

We are thrilled to report that 462 West Franklin Street in Chapel Hill is returning to use as a arts performance venue and classroom space. People’s Improv Theater, which has two New York venues already, has recently completed a renovation of the upstairs performance space and bar and “The PIT- Chapel Hill” began welcoming performance acts to their stage on December 16 and are already hosting a weekly Pitch Jam and Open Mic nights. The new stage is handicapped accessible and has flexible space for multiple performance types. Despite the name, The Pit will not be just an improv venue, but is currently open to all genres of performance. “We want to be open 7 nights a week and be a multipurpose arts venue”, explains Will Neville, Artistic Director at The Pit.

Interested?  Here is the form to submit a performance request.

IMG_8621_previewA more dramatic renovation is taking place in the downstairs space at The PIT and in the lobby. The lobby is getting a coffee shop, while the basement will include two classrooms, a podcast recording studio that can be rented out, and a gathering/co-working space for classroom participants, as well as customers of the coffee shop. Classes will start in January. Current offerings include classes on improv and podcasting, but Neville says he is open to discuss proposals for new classes in any arts discipline. Find the current class schedule here.  Contact information is here.

Neville recognizes that the venue is a work in progress. “We want to be here to serve the arts community” and will adapt use of the space and programs to meet that goal.  “Our first year will be very different from our third year”. To find out more about The Pit, visit their website or Facebook page.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Triangle’s Newest Film Festival Highlights All Aspects of Filmmaking

Beyond Film Festival Announced for The Cary Theater

The Triangle’s newest film Festival “BEYOND: The Film Festival” will be based out of The Cary Theater and seeks to celebrate the many facets of the art of storytelling through film. The Cary is already a hub and resource for the Triangle’s film community, hosting regular Rough Cuts Reviews (free screening nights for local filmmakers), as well as  Zombiepalooza and Sick Chick Flicks Film Festival and regular screens national new and classic independent films. Beyond will be a 4 day event, including workshops and other art forms exploring the Festival theme.Logo_Beyond.TFF_Cary Theater_BW.Reversed

It was The Cary Theater’s focus on cinema that led to creation of the festival.  Operations and Programs Supervisor, Joy Ennis, explains, “When we opened The Cary, we put “launch a signature film festival” on our list of goals. It’s been 3 ½ years and we feel like we’re at a point in our growth to take on a new challenge, so we decided to take the plunge. Our intention has always been to create an event that supports the mission of the theater – to provide a unique setting for cinema and live performance that creates a community centered gathering place in Downtown Cary and makes The Cary an institution in the downtown landscape. Since our primary focus is film – an event that celebrates the magic of this art form seemed like the perfect fit for us.”

Beyond will highlight all aspects of filmmaking, featuring a short film competition and screenplay writing competition. Each year, the festival will explore a new theme and focus on a different aspect of the filmmaking process. “We love the idea of looking “BEYOND” the final product of the finished film. Our intention is to highlight a “behind the scenes” area of filmmaking each year.” Joy added, “We’re starting with screen writing – because it is the bedrock that the film is built on. We envision each year to highlight a new aspect of filmmaking – cinematography, costume design, directing.”

Beyond 2018 – Focusing on Hometown Stories and Scriptwriting

For its opening year, the theme for the screenwriting competition and short films will be “Hometown Stories” and the Festival will explore the foundational aspect of filmmaking – the script. The call for applications elaborates: “Hometown Stories have a sense of place. It is where we grew up. Hometown has resonance of things past, things we hold dear, things we have abandoned. No other place we live will ever have the impact of our hometown. Whether the genre is comedy, drama, documentary or farce, the hometown always becomes a character and exerts its influence over the narrative. Hometown stories tell us about our beliefs, biases, dreams and nightmares. What’s your Hometown Story?”

To apply to this year’s Festival

Competition Short Films must have been completed after January 1, 2016 and should not exceed 30 minutes in length, including credits. All non-English language films must have English subtitles. Each film must follow the theme of “Hometown Stories”, but is not limited to genre.

Screenplays must have been completed after January 1, 2016. Submitted screenplays should be for short films and should not exceed 40 pages in length and written in English. Each film must follow the theme of “Hometown Stories”, but is not limited to genre. Click here to submit<

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Mothership Lands in Durham as a Home for Creatives

by Annie Poslusny

What do you get when you combine Krista Nordgren’s the Makery with Katie DeConto and Megan Jones’s Mercury Studio? The Mothership, which serves as an incubator space for small businesses of all kinds.

Mothership store front

Mothership’s retail space

The Mothership provides a holistic approach to supporting individuals with ideas. One of their recent workshops called “How to Begin” focused on the psychological hurdles creative people face. At the Mothership they will guide you as you think through the necessary steps to help you achieve your goals. Additional areas they provide assistance with include: time management and prioritization, work/life balance, financial intentionality, business development, cultivating and protecting internal resources, marketing, partnerships, and community engagement.

Co-working space at Mothership

Co-working space at Mothership

 

The Mothership is a home for ideas, filled with resources and support for all kinds of makers. They offer a workspace, a retail shop to showcase products, event space to gather and learn, as well as a collaborative community founded on acceptance. If you are looking for a supportive community for makers of all kinds The Mothership is located in downtown Durham at 401 W. Geer St. Learn more.

Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research. 

Horse & Buggy Press Move Expands Exhibition Space

Horse and Buggy PressBy Annie Poslusny

In February 2017, Horse and Buggy Press moved to their new location at 1116 Broad Street in Durham, down the street from Duke University. Horse and Buggy Press is an award-winning graphic design, letterpress printing shop and book production studio. At their new location, they now house a 500 square foot craft and art gallery, called “Horse & Buggy Press and Friends.

Twenty-five artists from North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina are currently featured, many of whom have collaborated with Dave Wofford, the gallery curator, as well as owner of Horse and Buggy Press. Exhibits rotate every three to four months, and there is a monthly open house starting in June from 5–8 pm the second Thursday of every month, which will include musicians or local street performers on the sidewalk in front of the store. Media presently on display includes: Glass, Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Fibers, Sculpture (small), Jewelry, and Wood.

Artists who are interested in having their work displayed at Horse and Buggy Press & Friends should contact Dave Wofford by email or drop by one of their monthly open houses. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 11–3ish, and the open houses are the second Thursday of each month beginning on June 8th from 5–8 pm.

Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research.

Tags: , , , , ,

Liberty Arts Move Expands Arts Space & Resources

IMG_2978

Open studio space

Liberty Warehouse has moved again … and again the move has allowed the collective to expand the resources they offer the Triangle arts community.  “With the move to our new, larger location we have been able to open a glass studio and offer classes at varying levels of skill, which is something we did not have the ability to provide in our prior spot. And with the larger footprint, we have more studio space available to offer artists.” say Board President, Diane Amato.

 

IMG_2973

Glass studio

 

Liberty Arts offers classes in welding, glass blowing, ceramics, plasma cutting, letterpress and wood turning. Along with those classes, they have welding machines and glass blowing time available to rent by the hour. And for artists who are looking for a home, they still have a few studio spaces left.

IMG_2974

Lady PIlot Letterpress’ studio at Liberty.

 

Liberty Arts Grand Re-opening is April 22 from 6-9 pm.  More info here.

For information about Liberty Arts classes, studio space or welding/glass blowing time check out the website or shoot them an email.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Living Arts Collective brings performance space and community in Durham

LAC-web---community-in-motionA new arts space, Living Arts Collective, has come alive in Durham! Still growing, the space is a haven for movement artists, musicians, and more!

The Living Arts Collective is a dynamic space suitable for community events, live music shows, dance socials, classes, workshops, performances, private lessons and rehearsals, art shows and more! Located at 410 W. Geer Street in Durham, the LAC Social Dance lr-4643Collective supports local artists and promotes community engagement “aims to “cultivate community through conscious living and creative movement by offering accessible space and resources for socially progressive arts, culture, conscious living, and wellness practices.” The Living Art Collective already hosts a wide range of artists with offerings include African dance, modern dance, partner dance (tango, fusion, blues, salsa, bachata, zouk, kizomba, swing and more), ecstatic dance, contact improvisation, massage, acroyoga, martial arts, theatre, drumming, live music… See the website for the latest events!

IMG_3910The space has a cork dance floor in the middle of a ~2000 sq.ft event space with an accommodating lobby space to create a beautiful event flow and features a live music ready sound system with ample power for any live show or the most hopping dance party, as well as theater ready lights and an ample assortment chairs and tables for everything from community potlucks to Tango Milongas.

The Living Arts Collective is still growing, excited to have just launched their Resident Artist Membership program which offers affordable flex-use of the space for creative art and special rates for events by participating artists, as well as Patron Memberships and to be launching fundraising for a new sprung floor to cover the whole space.

To find out more about Living Arts Collective, check out their website.

Tags: ,

Glas Offers Classes, Gallery and Venue space in Raleigh

Drains at Glas bear the logo.

Drains at Glas bear its logo.

Local neon artist, Nate Sheaffer, is creating a new space for his work, but also offering classes and space for others to show their art in his recently opened neon glass blowing studio and gallery “Glas“.  “I’m making a final home for my creative life to expand and develop” explains Sheaffer, who has previously operated three studios around the Triangle,  “This final home is more about creative diversity and experimentation than any of the previous iterations.”  The space is the former boiler room in the 190,000 square foot building now being developed as Dock 1053.

edb340f2-bfa2-4655-93fc-5a397114df9d

Boiler room space before renovation (minus the boilers).

The Space

Sheaffer’s vision for the space “is to teach neon glass blowing techniques to interested individuals, to open my space and self up to creative collaborations, and to provide a gallery/show space for new as well as experienced artists utilizing creative programming aimed at engaging a broad audience of art enthusiasts.”

Classes – “One of the most exciting projects is setting up neon glass blowing workshops that engage participants in the design and fabrication of their own neon pieces. Workshops run one night a week (Tuesdays 6-9 pm) for six weeks, culminating in a Saturday afternoon gallery showcase of participants’ work. When the show is over, students take their work home along with the memorable experience of having designed and created an illuminated work in glass.”

img_2085

Gallery space at Glas – Art by Kathleen Jardine, Philip Ernst, Louis St. Lewis and others.

Gallery –  According to Sheaffer, “The space also features an extravagance – a beautiful gallery, where experimental art can be shown and photographed and creative collaborations with musicians, dancers, photographers, cinematographers, and beginning artists can be given a chance to stretch and explore.”

Venue – “The gallery space has turned out beautifully and simply has to be experienced. With the collection of neon in the glass blowing area and the gorgeous gallery space, I’m making the majority of the shop available for event rental to help offset expenses and to share the space with a broader segment of the area.”

img_2098

Nate Scheaffer and collaborator Louis St. Lewis in the studio space at Glas.

Workshops – “The space is perfect for meetings and gatherings as well as workshops art related and non-art related. I have designed several team-building exercises for groups up to 20 that are perfect for corporate programing or simply as interesting event entertainment. In the not too distant future, we hope to add laboratory glass blowing classes and capabilities, also.”

Nate wants this space “to fill a niche in the wonderful art landscape others have forged downtown, in and around the warehouse district” and welomes ideas for collaborative programming with other galleries and workshops with other artists across different media.  Find out more about Glas or connect with them through the website. Glas is located 1053 E. Whitaker Mill Road, Suite 125 Raleigh, NC 27604.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Triangle Hidden Gem – Learn about Hayti Heritage Center’s arts spaces & programming

This article is part of a continuing series on creative resources in the Triangle that are either little known, or you may have heard of them, but may be unaware of the extent of the services and resources they offer. Have an idea for a future article? Let us know.

By Taryn Oesch

With all the new arts events, venues and groups popping up all over Durham, long-time arts organizations and events are often overlooked. Last weekend was the 29th Annual Bull Durham Blues Festival at the Performance Hall at Hayti Heritgage Center.  To find out more about the Organization behind this longstanding Durham arts event, we visited Hayti Heritage Center to learn more about its mission and programming.

Director, Angela Lee, in Hayti's historic 400 seat performance venue.

Director, Angela Lee, in Hayti’s historic 400 seat performance venue.

The center opened in 1975 under the management of the St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation. It’s a cultural enrichment and arts education facility whose mission, according to executive director Angela Lee, is “to preserve historic Hayti and to promote the African American experience through arts programs and events that benefit the broader community.” Booker T. Washington called the historic Hayti district “Black Wall Street,” and the Hayti Heritage Center works to honor that legacy, along with using the arts to bring communities and races together.

The center itself is the former St. Joseph’s AME Church, a national historic landmark. The beautiful venue is available for rent, with over 35,000 square feet of available space, including an auditorium that seats up to 400, community and meeting rooms, and a dance studio. There’s even affordable small office space.

Community and class rooms at Hayti, such as this Dance Studio, are available for rent.

Community and class rooms at Hayti, such as this Dance Studio, are available for rent.

The Hayti Heritage Center celebrates multiple art forms. Members of the community can sign up for classes on dance and martial arts, some for as little as $5 per class. The center also shows local artists in its Lobby Gallery – in February, the center hosted a Black History Month exhibition. At the Jambalaya Soul Slam, a staple program since 2005, local poets compete for a cash prize and membership in the Bull City Slam Team, which competes in regional and national competition every summer. The Heritage Music Series and Heritage Film Festival add to the cultural offerings.

Hayti's Lobby Gallery

Hayti’s Lobby Gallery

There’s a variety of ways artists and arts supporters can get involved with the Hayti Heritage Center and help, in Lee’s words, “preserve the heritage and embrace the experience of the arts.” Take a class, try out for the Bull City Slam Team, come to an event, rent their facility, and, of course, follow them on Facebook and Twitter.  Stop by, see the art, tour the performance venue, meet the hard-working staff and thank them for their work to continue to impact of this longstanding venue on the Durham arts community.

Taryn Oesch is an editor, writer, and long-time Raleigh resident, graduating from Wakefield High School and Meredith College. She volunteers with local arts organizations and Miracle League of the Triangle. In her free time, she plays the piano, spoils her godchildren, and battles for apartment space with her uncontrollable collection of books. Website 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Triangle Makerspaces added to ArtWorks Resources

by Dana Gentry

A makerspace provides an environment that fosters innovation, creativity, collaboration, and learning by doing and making. Makerspaces across Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill provide the opportunity for all residents of the Triangle to engage with and participate in out-of-the-box artistic involvement  by

Makerbot

Makerbot at Raleigh Makerspace

utilizing nuanced ways to produce their own kind of final product. Whether a participant looking for a space to be creative in has a long history of artistic engagement or is looking to tap into their creative side for perhaps the first time, the variety of opportunities to realize all types of talent in this area accommodates all that are seeking out a way to embrace and tap into their creativity.

Durham Arts Council Clay Studio. Photo by Teri Saylor

Durham Arts Council Clay Studio. (Photo by Teri Saylor)

Triangle ArtWorks has created a new Resource Page of makerspaces in the area to inform Triangle residents of what each different space has to offer to accommodate for different people’s interests, talents, and desires to become tangibly involved with the arts in their own ways. From clay studios to 3D printers to turning unconventional materials into something completely different, there are opportunities for everyone to involve themselves with the arts and to become their own kind of maker.

Find the new Makerspace Resource page here.

Dana Gentry is junior at UNC and is working at Triangle ArtWorks this semester as part of the UNC Apples (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences & Service) program. In addition to lots of other great work, Dana researched and created the Makerspace Resource Section. This summer, she continues her service to the Triangle Arts Community, working with Durham Arts Council as an intern. 

Tags: , , , ,