Archive for the ‘triangle artworks’ Category

Four Regional Leaders Join Triangle ArtWorks Board

by Annie Poslusny

Crucial to the success of Triangle ArtWorks is a strong Board of Directors. In its July meeting, ArtWorks Board of Directors welcomed four new members: Amy Russell, Jack Arnold, William A. Gregory, and Cynthia Deis. 

Amy Russell

Amy Russell joined Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) as the Director of Programming in 2014, curating a multi-disciplinary season of 40+ performances, engaging artists in unique fellowships across campus, and maintaining CPA’s global artistic relationships. Amy has played a lead role in developing the vision for CPA’s newest venue, CURRENT, a black box theater and studio space dedicated to installations and other immersive experiences, scheduled to open in the fall of 2017. Prior to joining CPA, Amy oversaw programming for the North Carolina Symphony, and served as Executive Producer of their radio broadcast series. A lifelong student of music, she holds a degree in performance from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Amy Russell

Amy Russell

Jack Arnold

Jack Arnold has taught at colleges and universities throughout the US, the American Dance Festival, the Pilobolus Institute, and the Guangdong Dance Company in Guangzhou, China.

Jack holds a MFA from UNC-Greensboro and a BFA from UNC School of the Arts. You can often find him running trails at Umstead State Park or sneaking away for a quick morning surf session at Wrightsville Beach. Jack Arnold, a native of Enfield, NC, began his residential real estate career in Chapel Hill in 1996 and joined Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby International Realty in 2000. With offices in Raleigh and Chapel Hill, he represents buyers and sellers throughout the Triangle.

Jack came to real estate after a 20 year career in modern dance, including four years as a member of Pilobolus Dance Theatre. He has performed worldwide.

 

Jack Arnold

Jack Arnold 

William A. Gregory

William “Bill” Gregory is currently the Artist in Residence at Duke University Hospital. Bill helps manage the hospital art collection including installation, de-installation, and maintenance. In addition, he provides graphic design support for events, manuals, and promotional materials. Bill also created and implemented a self-guided walking art tour for patients and families.

Bill was a 11+ year North Carolina Community College instructor where he taught studio art and graphic design. During his time teaching, he also worked with art museums, art galleries, and local universities to create educational curriculum for traditional and non-traditional classroom settings. He managed the Frank Creech Art Gallery on the main campus of Johnston Community College.

He holds a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Montana, as well as a Bachelor of Fine Arts from East Carolina University.

Bill Gregory

Bill Gregory

Cynthia Deis

Cynthia Deis is an arts educator, retail consultant and writer with a lifetime of connections to the art and maker communities. Her career has ranged from non-profit arts organizations to for-profit crafts retail, with time spent in classrooms, studios and sound stages, but she is never far from her sketchbook or her notepad. An active enthusiast of the creative community in the Triangle, she can be found at art events of all levels, from black tie to untied sneakers

Cynthia Deis

Cynthia Deis

 

Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research.

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The Mothership Lands in Durham as a Home for Creatives

by Annie Poslusny

What do you get when you combine Krista Nordgren’s the Makery with Katie DeConto and Megan Jones’s Mercury Studio? The Mothership, which serves as an incubator space for small businesses of all kinds.

Mothership store front

Mothership’s retail space

The Mothership provides a holistic approach to supporting individuals with ideas. One of their recent workshops called “How to Begin” focused on the psychological hurdles creative people face. At the Mothership they will guide you as you think through the necessary steps to help you achieve your goals. Additional areas they provide assistance with include: time management and prioritization, work/life balance, financial intentionality, business development, cultivating and protecting internal resources, marketing, partnerships, and community engagement.

Co-working space at Mothership

Co-working space at Mothership

 

The Mothership is a home for ideas, filled with resources and support for all kinds of makers. They offer a workspace, a retail shop to showcase products, event space to gather and learn, as well as a collaborative community founded on acceptance. If you are looking for a supportive community for makers of all kinds The Mothership is located in downtown Durham at 401 W. Geer St. Learn more.

Annie Poslusny is an art history major and interior design/studio arts minor at Meredith College. She enjoys drawing and creating three-dimensional works of art, writing, and research. 

Liberty Arts Move Expands Arts Space & Resources

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Open studio space

Liberty Warehouse has moved again … and again the move has allowed the collective to expand the resources they offer the Triangle arts community.  “With the move to our new, larger location we have been able to open a glass studio and offer classes at varying levels of skill, which is something we did not have the ability to provide in our prior spot. And with the larger footprint, we have more studio space available to offer artists.” say Board President, Diane Amato.

 

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Glass studio

 

Liberty Arts offers classes in welding, glass blowing, ceramics, plasma cutting, letterpress and wood turning. Along with those classes, they have welding machines and glass blowing time available to rent by the hour. And for artists who are looking for a home, they still have a few studio spaces left.

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Lady PIlot Letterpress’ studio at Liberty.

 

Liberty Arts Grand Re-opening is April 22 from 6-9 pm.  More info here.

For information about Liberty Arts classes, studio space or welding/glass blowing time check out the website or shoot them an email.

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Living Arts Collective brings performance space and community in Durham

LAC-web---community-in-motionA new arts space, Living Arts Collective, has come alive in Durham! Still growing, the space is a haven for movement artists, musicians, and more!

The Living Arts Collective is a dynamic space suitable for community events, live music shows, dance socials, classes, workshops, performances, private lessons and rehearsals, art shows and more! Located at 410 W. Geer Street in Durham, the LAC Social Dance lr-4643Collective supports local artists and promotes community engagement “aims to “cultivate community through conscious living and creative movement by offering accessible space and resources for socially progressive arts, culture, conscious living, and wellness practices.” The Living Art Collective already hosts a wide range of artists with offerings include African dance, modern dance, partner dance (tango, fusion, blues, salsa, bachata, zouk, kizomba, swing and more), ecstatic dance, contact improvisation, massage, acroyoga, martial arts, theatre, drumming, live music… See the website for the latest events!

IMG_3910The space has a cork dance floor in the middle of a ~2000 sq.ft event space with an accommodating lobby space to create a beautiful event flow and features a live music ready sound system with ample power for any live show or the most hopping dance party, as well as theater ready lights and an ample assortment chairs and tables for everything from community potlucks to Tango Milongas.

The Living Arts Collective is still growing, excited to have just launched their Resident Artist Membership program which offers affordable flex-use of the space for creative art and special rates for events by participating artists, as well as Patron Memberships and to be launching fundraising for a new sprung floor to cover the whole space.

To find out more about Living Arts Collective, check out their website.

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Triangle ArtWorks Director Elected to AFTA Private Sector Council

We are thrilled to announce that our Executive Director, Beth Yerxa, has been elected to the Americans for the Arts (AFTA) Private Sector Council. AFTA is the leading organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America and Private Sector Council members advise Americans for the Arts’ staff on developing programs and services that will build a deeper connection to the field and the network membership. As part of the Private Sector Council, Yerxa will also work with fellow arts leaders to develop and implement private-sector advocacy programs and serve as leaders to other local arts agencies seeking to connect with the private sector.

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Private Sector Council members of a tour of the Wynwood Arts District in Miami.

“Americans for the Arts strives to cultivate the next generation of arts leaders in America, and I am pleased to welcome Beth Yerxa to our advisory council,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “These leaders are willing to dedicate their time and expertise to work with peers across the country to shape national programs and messages and help craft services for states, communities, and local organizations”.

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Brainstorming notes from the Council meeting (w/ a view of Miami!)

This position also provides Triangle ArtWorks a unique opportunity to deepen relationships we already have with other arts leaders around the Country and not only keep up with, but be a part of affecting changing trends in the arts around the country.  This knowledge and access will help Yerxa and Triangle ArtWorks advise Triangle arts leaders, as well as serve the Triangle arts community better. Directors of arts organizations from Miami/Dade, Nashville, Philadelphia, San Francisco and many other cities and towns are represented on the Council.

In January, Yerxa participated in her first Private Sector meeting, where she was briefed on changing trends in arts, such as the CREATE Act.  She also provided input into the discussion about the changing field of arts support and the role of the arts and culture segment in the larger “creative economy” and tp talk about the work that Triangle ArtWorks is doing to support this business segment here in the Triangle.

 

 

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NC Start-up “SkillPop” Makes it Easier to Learn Creative Skills

logo_dark-5740bff3725325690e13508d219162ba4d6c8e1ec17ce6a63ccb5781c0da93c6-1SkillPop is a new NC-based startup seeking to make in-person learning fresh and accessible. In an age where learning is trending online, SkillPop curates in-person classes where trying a new skill is social and engaging. “We don’t think you should have to spend huge amounts of time or money just to try something new or build your skills, so we make it simpler,” says founder Haley Bohon.

Watercolor RDUSkillPop hosts classes on a variety of topics from Handlettering to How to Launch Your Business which range from $20-35/class. Courses are held pop-up style in unique venues around the community and are taught by local experts looking to share their skills. Each class is bite-sized and focused so that you leave with the tools and knowledge to start pursuing your passion.

There are several ways to get involved:

Learn  Take a class and see what it’s all about! New classes come out every Tuesday morning and are announced in SkillPop’s newsletter. To sign up for the newsletter and/or see a list of current classes, visit  Skillpop’s website.SkillPop Photography Class

Teach  Have a skill you want to share? SkillPop accepts applications from teachers on a rolling basis and is currently looking for more teachers in the Raleigh area. More information on how to apply can be found here:

Host  SkillPop is currently popping-up in unique venues around Raleigh from historic churches to coworking spaces. If you have a venue you’d like to be used for classes send SkillPop an email.

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“Establishing Shot” Highlights Triangle Screen Talent

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Like many in the Triangle, local filmmakers, producers and actors Andrew Martin, Paul Kilpatrick and Olivia Griego saw a need and simply jumped in to fill it. The need? A way to promote the strength and diversity of local talent to a broader audience. Martin explains, “We have talented neighbors, who excel in theater, improv, stand up comedy, music, dance, burlesque, roller derby, wrestling, fashion, photography, and film. Being filmmakers by trade, we wanted to encourage and showcase these incredible people and bring these diverse talents together on screen.”  So they created the website An Establishing Shot.

Establishing Shot is a series of short improvised films, starring local Triangle & NC-based talent, invoking the spirit of old Hollywood’s screen tests. An “establishing shot” in filmmaking terms is typically used to open a new scene and provide a wider view of a setting or location in the story. It’s a traditional way to tell the viewer where the action takes place and to initiate a contextual understanding of what is about to happen on screen.

Establishing Shot provides an easily accessible online resource for local talent to showcase their work and makes it easier for business seeking talent, both from NC and beyond, to easily view the breadth of local talent.  “We see Establishing Shot Raleigh as the first time many people outside the community will become aware of the range of screen talent we have living here. This is designed to be an intriguing tease of dramatic and comedic possibilities, casting light on many of the gifted performers who call this region home.” say Martin. The hope is that rather than bringing talent in from elsewhere for productions filmed here, Establishing Shot will make it easier for those casting films or other productions to view the work of local talent and “hire local”.

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Katie Barrett, Liam O’Neill and Mikaela Saccoccio in “Why Do You Need to Get Away” on Establishing Shot.

Another reason for creating Establishing Shot was to reveal a new side to the Triangle’s well-established theater and performance talent, by giving them the opportunity and confidence to do more acting in front of the camera. Martin adds, “We also wanted to give the behind-the-scenes crew the chance to have some raw unscripted fun, play around with cameras and lights in a non-corporate or commercial setting, and to create a positive experience for everyone working together as a well-orchestrated team.”

Short term, the project will provide Triangle actors and performers the opportunity to create original material for a reel. Long term, the creators hope to generate increased interest and enthusiasm for the Triangle’s brand of unique characters and creators and inspire more original works of film, television, and visual art.

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Paul Kilpatrick and Germain Choffart film a scene.

Getting the Project Started 

“We originally reached out to over 250 vetted and proven performers and were only able to make the scheduling work for 30 of them this time around. The wealth and depth of talent in this community is strong and growing.” says Martin. They shot 50 scenes over 2 days of filming and have been very gradually releasing each one. Having full time careers and families, the labor-intensive and time-consuming aspect of this project has been the editing.

What’s Next? 

Once Establishing Shot Raleigh becomes established, there will be an even greater chance for visual artists, musicians, writers, and creative people of all kinds to naturally integrate into the design and delivery of the scenes.  The creators are open to meeting and working with the large, diverse group of artists and artisans throughout our creative community. In the meantime, Martin adds, “We need editors, or even people who are dabbling in editing, to help us finish. Adobe Premiere only, since the project is organized and ready to share most easily in this format.  Next time around we will need help in every department.”

They also ask the Triangle Arts Community to be sure to share and comment on the video scenes to help get the word out. To be successful, they want to be seen in our local market, but it will be of even greater benefit if filmmakers and audiences outside our community begin to discover the talent available here.

Visit EstRaleigh.com to get more info and contact Andrew, Olivia and Paul through the website.

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Glas Offers Classes, Gallery and Venue space in Raleigh

Drains at Glas bear the logo.

Drains at Glas bear its logo.

Local neon artist, Nate Sheaffer, is creating a new space for his work, but also offering classes and space for others to show their art in his recently opened neon glass blowing studio and gallery “Glas“.  “I’m making a final home for my creative life to expand and develop” explains Sheaffer, who has previously operated three studios around the Triangle,  “This final home is more about creative diversity and experimentation than any of the previous iterations.”  The space is the former boiler room in the 190,000 square foot building now being developed as Dock 1053.

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Boiler room space before renovation (minus the boilers).

The Space

Sheaffer’s vision for the space “is to teach neon glass blowing techniques to interested individuals, to open my space and self up to creative collaborations, and to provide a gallery/show space for new as well as experienced artists utilizing creative programming aimed at engaging a broad audience of art enthusiasts.”

Classes – “One of the most exciting projects is setting up neon glass blowing workshops that engage participants in the design and fabrication of their own neon pieces. Workshops run one night a week (Tuesdays 6-9 pm) for six weeks, culminating in a Saturday afternoon gallery showcase of participants’ work. When the show is over, students take their work home along with the memorable experience of having designed and created an illuminated work in glass.”

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Gallery space at Glas – Art by Kathleen Jardine, Philip Ernst, Louis St. Lewis and others.

Gallery –  According to Sheaffer, “The space also features an extravagance – a beautiful gallery, where experimental art can be shown and photographed and creative collaborations with musicians, dancers, photographers, cinematographers, and beginning artists can be given a chance to stretch and explore.”

Venue – “The gallery space has turned out beautifully and simply has to be experienced. With the collection of neon in the glass blowing area and the gorgeous gallery space, I’m making the majority of the shop available for event rental to help offset expenses and to share the space with a broader segment of the area.”

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Nate Scheaffer and collaborator Louis St. Lewis in the studio space at Glas.

Workshops – “The space is perfect for meetings and gatherings as well as workshops art related and non-art related. I have designed several team-building exercises for groups up to 20 that are perfect for corporate programing or simply as interesting event entertainment. In the not too distant future, we hope to add laboratory glass blowing classes and capabilities, also.”

Nate wants this space “to fill a niche in the wonderful art landscape others have forged downtown, in and around the warehouse district” and welomes ideas for collaborative programming with other galleries and workshops with other artists across different media.  Find out more about Glas or connect with them through the website. Glas is located 1053 E. Whitaker Mill Road, Suite 125 Raleigh, NC 27604.

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NC Science Festival seeks arts/science proposals

Jonathan Frederick of the NC Science Festival has come to us to help him connect with Triangle artists.  He is ncsf_rgb_updatelooking for artists, of all disciplines, with ideas for events or projects that explore the connection between arts, design and science.  Are you a scientist that is an artist or an artist that explores science themes?  Or have a crazy idea for an event, installation, talk … whatever – that crosses the streams of art and science?  Here is a letter from Jonathan to Triangle artists:

 

Greetings from UNC-Chapel Hill—

I direct the North Carolina Science Festival, an annual statewide celebration of science and its connections to our daily lives. We’re based out of UNC’s Morehead Planetarium and Science Center. Each April, we produce and facilitate hundreds of events across North Carolina. To give you a sense of scale, this past April we had over 900 events in 99 of NC’s 100 counties attended by 415,000 participants. These events range from talks on college campuses, nature hikes at parks, demonstrations at museums, hands-on storytime science shows at public libraries, community-wide street fairs, large expos, and more.

Take a look at our 2016 Final Report to get a sense for the feel for what we do.

For the 2017 NC Science Festival, we’re exploring the theme of Art & Design. I would love to connect with artists on what might be possible. With enough interest, I’m happy to host a brainstorming meeting sometime in the near future. If I could have it all, I’d love to see: science-themed murals painted in cities and towns in NC, theatrical performances, installations, musical interpretations and so on. There is a ton of potential all tied to time, talents and funding. We have a network of thousands of scientists who may be up for collaborating as well.

If you’re interested in talking further, please let me now.

Warm regards,
Jonathan Frederick
Director, NC Science Festival
Producer/Host, Carolina Science Cafe
UNC’s Morehead Planetarium and Science Center
University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
@jonmikefred

Got an idea?  Shoot Jonathan an email!   And I know you are all wondering, is there money in it?  The answer is a solid “maybe”.

Beth

 

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Triangle Hidden Gem – Learn about Hayti Heritage Center’s arts spaces & programming

This article is part of a continuing series on creative resources in the Triangle that are either little known, or you may have heard of them, but may be unaware of the extent of the services and resources they offer. Have an idea for a future article? Let us know.

By Taryn Oesch

With all the new arts events, venues and groups popping up all over Durham, long-time arts organizations and events are often overlooked. Last weekend was the 29th Annual Bull Durham Blues Festival at the Performance Hall at Hayti Heritgage Center.  To find out more about the Organization behind this longstanding Durham arts event, we visited Hayti Heritage Center to learn more about its mission and programming.

Director, Angela Lee, in Hayti's historic 400 seat performance venue.

Director, Angela Lee, in Hayti’s historic 400 seat performance venue.

The center opened in 1975 under the management of the St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation. It’s a cultural enrichment and arts education facility whose mission, according to executive director Angela Lee, is “to preserve historic Hayti and to promote the African American experience through arts programs and events that benefit the broader community.” Booker T. Washington called the historic Hayti district “Black Wall Street,” and the Hayti Heritage Center works to honor that legacy, along with using the arts to bring communities and races together.

The center itself is the former St. Joseph’s AME Church, a national historic landmark. The beautiful venue is available for rent, with over 35,000 square feet of available space, including an auditorium that seats up to 400, community and meeting rooms, and a dance studio. There’s even affordable small office space.

Community and class rooms at Hayti, such as this Dance Studio, are available for rent.

Community and class rooms at Hayti, such as this Dance Studio, are available for rent.

The Hayti Heritage Center celebrates multiple art forms. Members of the community can sign up for classes on dance and martial arts, some for as little as $5 per class. The center also shows local artists in its Lobby Gallery – in February, the center hosted a Black History Month exhibition. At the Jambalaya Soul Slam, a staple program since 2005, local poets compete for a cash prize and membership in the Bull City Slam Team, which competes in regional and national competition every summer. The Heritage Music Series and Heritage Film Festival add to the cultural offerings.

Hayti's Lobby Gallery

Hayti’s Lobby Gallery

There’s a variety of ways artists and arts supporters can get involved with the Hayti Heritage Center and help, in Lee’s words, “preserve the heritage and embrace the experience of the arts.” Take a class, try out for the Bull City Slam Team, come to an event, rent their facility, and, of course, follow them on Facebook and Twitter.  Stop by, see the art, tour the performance venue, meet the hard-working staff and thank them for their work to continue to impact of this longstanding venue on the Durham arts community.

Taryn Oesch is an editor, writer, and long-time Raleigh resident, graduating from Wakefield High School and Meredith College. She volunteers with local arts organizations and Miracle League of the Triangle. In her free time, she plays the piano, spoils her godchildren, and battles for apartment space with her uncontrollable collection of books. Website 

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